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Archive for June, 2012

This week brought us necessary emergency repairs to the end of Pine Street at RT5. Approximately 20 feet down, an old sewer line had been compromised. The following are photos of the crews, equipment and massive excavation.

Road excavation and trench box around the much deeper hole in the ground.

Looking south from up the street at job site.

The large CAT is the piece of equipment being used to dig the hole.

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It’s been a busy few weeks for me, with trips to Rome, Schenectady, Liverpool and back to Schenectady, all in the pursuit of regional affiliation.

In Rome, I participated in a strategic planning session with members of the Mohawk Valley Regional Economic Development Council (MVREDC). We’ve been focused on reviewing last year’s projects, identifying new scoring criteria and priority projects, and reporting on our progress as a newly formed and amazingly cooperative entity. We’ve all been pleasantly surprised at the willingness of all six counties to work collaboratively toward common goals.

In Schenectady, I was honored to serve as a panelist at Congressman Tonko’s “Mighty Waters” Conference, again, tailored to look at regional commonalities experienced by communities necklaced along the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers. Two hundred fifty stakeholders from all walks of public and private life gathered at Union College to discuss waterfront development, job creation, environmental issues, educational opportunities, tourism and historic preservation throughout the Capital Region. In a manner that is in keeping with his progressive vision for this area, the Congressman unveiled legislation to create the Hudson-Mohawk River Basin Commission.

The Commission would carry out projects and conduct research on water resources in the basin, which stretches across five states and includes five sub-basins, increasing our understanding of these waterways and the dramatic impact they have on our lives.

The highway soon called me farther westward to Liverpool to enjoy a day with members of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor Commission. “Stretching 524 miles across the full expanse of upstate New York, the Erie, Champlain, Oswego, and Cayuga-Seneca Canals are among our nation’s great successes of engineering, vision, hard work, and sacrifice.” Similarly, the Commission works to showcase this tremendous asset and has been instrumental in facilitating tourism, economic development and historic preservation along this spectacular state treasure.


Lastly, I ended up at a meeting in Schenectady’s magnificent City Hall to launch a new partnership: one of New York State’s first landbanks, a collaborative effort between the City of Schenectady, Schenectady County and the City of Amsterdam. We are fortunate that Planning Commission Chairman Bob DiCaprio and URA Chairman Bob Martin have agreed to serve on our city’s behalf. As with the other efforts cited above, this progressive initiative marks a new age of cooperation between communities that had been traditionally separated by geographical and territorial isolationism.

I am profoundly honored to play a role in this emerging regional sensibility and believe strongly that these relationships will change our future in ways we are only beginning to understand.

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Thai Green Curry With Seafood
Bon Appétit | May 2009
by Jeanne Thiel Kelley

When the topic of chowder comes up, debates rage about the merits of the creamy New England style versus the red, tomato-packed Manhattan version. We’d be hard-pressed to choose a favorite, but one thing is for sure: We love chowder. It’s comforting, hearty, and full of seafood. The same can be said of Thai-style seafood curry. Coconut milk stands in for cream, and curry paste packs a warming punch. It’s global chowder— and it’s delicious. That’s something we can all agree on.
Yield: Makes 4 servings

2 tablespoons unrefined peanut oil
5 green onions, finely chopped, dark green parts separated from white and pale green parts
3 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro, divided
3 garlic cloves, minced
6 tablespoons Thai green curry paste
1 1/4 cups water
1 13-to 14-ounce can unsweetened coconut milk
2 small fresh red Thai chiles or 1 red jalapeño chile

2 kaffir lime leaves
1 tablespoon fish sauce (such as nam pla or nuoc nam)
1 large carrot, peeled, thinly sliced on diagonal (about 1 cup)
4 cups thinly sliced bok choy
8 ounces uncooked medium shrimp, peeled, deveined
8 ounces bay scallops
1 pound green or black mussels, scrubbed, debearded
2 tablespoons minced fresh basil
2 cups (about) steamed rice

Note: Thane eliminated the mussels and doubled the shrimp and scallop quantities.

Heat oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add white and pale green parts of green onions, 1 tablespoon cilantro, and garlic; sauté until tender, about 2 minutes. Add curry paste; cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add 1 1/4 cups water, coconut milk, chiles, lime leaves, and fish sauce. Bring to simmer. Add carrot; cover and cook until carrot is just tender, about 5 minutes. Layer bok choy, shrimp, scallops, and mussels in pan. Cover and simmer until mussels open and seafood and bok choy are cooked (discard mussels that do not open), about 5 minutes. Stir in dark green parts of green onions, 2 tablespoons cilantro, and basil.
Divide rice among 4 shallow bowls. Ladle curry over rice and serve.

Ingredient tips:
Unrefined peanut oil can be found at natural foods stores and Asian markets. Thai green curry paste, coconut milk, and fish sauce are sold at many supermarkets and at Asian markets. Look for fresh or frozen kaffir lime leaves at Asian markets. If unavailable, use 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice and 1/2 teaspoon grated lime peel for each lime leaf.

Epicurious.com © Condé Nast Digital, Inc. All rights reserved.

Read More http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/printerfriendly/Thai-Green-Curry-with-Seafood-352634#ixzz1xRAEtUGf

String Bean & Arugula Salad
Epicurious | May 2012
by John Schlimm


Grilling Vegan Style
In this unusual pairing, the string beans and baby arugula work wonders for each other. Wilting the arugula with the hot, garlicky grilled beans is a nice trick for bringing the two together. While you can use regular arugula if you must, baby arugula is far milder in flavor, so try to find it if you can.
Yield: 3 to 4 servings

3/4 pound green and/or yellow string beans, trimmed
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, peeled and pressed
2 cups baby or regular arugula, trimmed and chopped
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Heat the grill to medium-high.
In a large bowl, toss the string beans with the olive oil and garlic. Let the beans rest for 10 minutes or so, then place the beans on a large square of heavy-duty aluminum foil. Fold the foil over the beans and fold down the ends of the foil twice. Place the foil packet on the grill, seam side up, and grill for 25 to 30 minutes. Let the beans cool for a few minutes, then combine them in a roomy bowl with the arugula, lemon zest, and salt and pepper to taste, tossing until the arugula is wilted, 2 to 3 minutes.

Note: Thanes only tossed for a minute or so, and went for a livelier arugala leaf.

Source Information
From the book Grilling Vegan Style: 125 Fired-Up Recipes to Turn Every Bite into a Backyard BBQ by John Schlimm. Reprinted by arrangement with Da Capo Lifelong, a member of the Perseus Books Group. Copyright © 2012.

Read More http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/printerfriendly/String-Bean-Arugula-Salad-51100200#ixzz1xR9lJTLd

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The kids and I went down to the park on Division Street to bedazzle the second side of the handball court wall, opposite the tiger mural. It took us just about three hours and about three quarts of sweat. The following photos document the journey.

Lines for play contributed by a new friend. 🙂

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